Our services can only continue to be delivered free of charge with the continued support of our volunteer listeners, counsellors, therapists and fundraisers, often referred to as ‘the lifeblood of the organisation’.

Our volunteer listeners and therapists receive extensive induction and training to the centre and all of our counsellors and therapists have achieved professional accreditation in their disciplines. 

We believe that being listened to in confidence and accepted without prejudice can help to alleviate the difficulties experienced in the cancer journey.
 
The kindness and goodwill of our volunteers ensures that we can continue to deliver our services free of charge and also raise the necessary funds to ensure the project can continue to develop and expand.


Stories FroM our Volunteers

“The first thing I want to say is I love working in Cork ARC as a volunteer listener. It is not something I sought but the opportunity came to me through an invitation from a friend. It was about three years ago that I started, a decision that felt so right at the time and my commitment continues to become stronger each Friday morning as I arrive at Cork ARC.

Cork ARC holds the sick and the healthy, the vulnerable and the strong, it’s a good place to visit if you just want a chat or a cuppa and there is always a warm welcome and a listening ear, or two.
— Catherine Twomey

We get many visitors to the house some have appointments and others just ‘drop in’ I realise that for me one of the most important things that I have to offer to anyone calling is to greet them warmly and allow them to get a sense of their surroundings and to feel safe. Most visitors love the atmosphere and ambiance in the house and often comment on it.

I work with and meet wonderful people every Friday and the fear and stigma I grew up with in regard to cancer has dissipated greatly. I am constantly learning from patients and their families and my role is to be supportive by listening and just staying with them in their experience.

Sometimes through our meeting they get a glimpse of their own strength. It’s painful at times as my natural tendency would be to try ‘fix it’ but that’s not how it works. 

Cork ARC holds the sick and the healthy, the vulnerable and the strong, it’s a good place to visit if you just want a chat or a cuppa and there is always a warm welcome and a listening ear, or two.

 


Along this volunteer journey, many friends and colleagues have begun fundraising also for Cork ARC as they have seen, from people like me, the great work and support this service offers to cancer patients and their families alike.
— Fiona Kingston

Cork ARC Cancer Support House came into my life in March 2009 - it was a meeting I will always remember. My Dad, Vincent, my sister Catherine and I arrived up to O’Donovan Rossa road to discuss our idea around raising funds for Cork ARC in memory of my brother, Daniel. Sadly, Daniel had passed away from Hodgkins Lymphoma the previous month, at the tender age of 25 years. We were met with understanding and warmth from all we met in Cork ARC that day.

During Daniel’s brave battle with cancer he used the services of Cork ARC so it was only fitting that in our quest to keep Daniel’s memory alive, we would help raise funds for this very worthy cause. In Summer 2009 Daniel’s friends and family rallied and over 700 walkers and runners took part in the Cork city marathon that Summer. This was followed by a bunch of friends taking part in the gruelling Malin to Mizen cycle in August 2009.
 
Each year since then, the annual Daniel Kingston 5km road race takes place in Macroom, Daniel’s home town, where young and old take to the streets in his memory. In 2014 our total fundraising efforts broke through the €200,000 mark which is testament to Daniel’s memory and to the work of Cork ARC Cancer Support House.
 
Along this volunteer journey, many friends and colleagues have begun fundraising also for Cork ARC as they have seen, from people like me, the great work and support this service offers to cancer patients and their families alike.

Many of my work colleagues at Ulster Bank now help with Cork ARC’s annual Flag Day Collection in Cork, volunteer for bag-packing and fundraise through sports and community events. It is a very positive experience for all concerned and good to be able to support our community in a positive way.
 
Most families are in some way touched by cancer, so it is really important to me and my family that we continue to support and raise awareness for Cork ARC Cancer Support House. In so doing, we keep the name and memory alive of a treasured son, brother and friend, Daniel Kingston.